Study: Processed Meat Raises Colorectal Cancer Risk

Study: Processed Meat Raises Colorectal Cancer Risk

 

Study: Processed Meat Raises Colorectal Cancer Risk

Study: Processed Meat Raises Colorectal Cancer Risk

Many studies have shown that eating too much red meat is bad for your health; but, a new study has found that eating processed meat significantly increases the risk of colorectal cancer in some people.  

Eating five or more servings per week of processed meat more than doubles the risk of colorectal cancer in people who have certain variants of a specific gene, according to Jane Figueiredo of the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine.  Colorectal cancer is a leading form of cancer disease and death worldwide.

The findings are based on a meta-analysis of 10 earlier studies involving 18,000 people in the United States, Canada, Australia and Europe, which looked at the health effects of eating meats that contain nitrates as preservatives.

“It’s anything that is cured, dried, smoked, cooked [or] packaged.  And so the most common items around the countries we were studying would include bacon, ham, hot dogs, sausages, pate, cold cuts,” said Figueiredo.

The scientists compared the blood samples of some 9,000 people with colorectal cancer to 9,000 people without the disease, looking at one particular region of the genome.  Colorectal cancer is a complex illness with some 30 genetic variations tied to an increased risk of developing it.  

The researchers found the people with two of the genetic variants that were the focus of the study, and who ate processed meats almost every day, had the highest risk for colorectal cancer.

Figueiredo says the potentially harmful alleles – or changes in a specific gene – are extremely common.

“It happens in one in three individuals; that these individuals are actually at even at higher risk of the carcinogenic effects in processed meat,” she said.

Does that mean that people with two copies of the genetic variants can eat more bacon and ham than those at the highest cancer risk?

“People have asked me that and I think that we should also limit our consumption of processed meat.  It still more modestly increases risk at least in individuals that don’t have this variant allele.  But it still is a small effect.  It’s just a much larger effect in individuals that carry certain genetic changes,” said Figueiredo.

Her team systematically sifted through millions of genetic variants of the study participants, identifying those that are associated with the effects of meat, fiber, fruit and vegetable consumption.  Figueiredo says the investigation is the first to look at whether genes modify the impact of food on health.

The study by Jane Figueiredo and colleagues is published in the journal PLoS Genetics.  

Cameroon Heart Patients Have a Bumpy Road to Care (Watch audio report)

Cameroon Heart Patients Have a Bumpy Road to Care (Watch audio report)

Cameroon Heart Patients Have a Bumpy Road to Care (Watch audio report)

Cameroon Heart Patients Have a Bumpy Road to Care (Watch audio report)

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 — The best heart care in central Africa is probably found in a sophisticated cardiac care center outside of Kumbo Town, 450 kilometers northwest of Cameroon’s capital, Yaounde.  But the location is so remote and the roads are so bad that many who desperately need the superior care of the Tertiary Sisters of St. Francis can’t get there.
 
Thirteen-year-old Assana Mfout almost died on her way to hospital. Her heart was failing, and the journey involved riding down many bumpy roads. The St. Elizabeth Catholic General Hospital’s cardiac center is located on the remote plateaus of northwestern Cameroon. It’s the best hospital for the procedures the young girl needed.
 
The trip was unavoidable. Assana’s heart began showing signs of failure when she was just nine. It would beat violently from time to time. When she was 12, she could not walk for five minutes without stopping to pant. She would collapse in utter exhaustion two or three times a week. The school principal was afraid she would die on campus, so Assana was sent away from school.
 
In mid-February 2014, Assana Mfout was recovering in Ward V.
 
Cameroon’s medical pace maker
 
Each year, thousands of patients like Mfout make the uncomfortable ride to the center to receive the sisters’ cutting-edge care. Last year, doctors performed more than 100 open-heart surgeries. The center has begun implanting pacemakers and plans to introduce other procedures in the coming years. It’s the only such facility in Cameroon, and perhaps in all of Central Africa.

St. Elizabeth’s is well-equipped and meets the best international standards. Its two theatres and 12-bed intensive care unit are fitted with interlacing tubes, hanging lamps, monitors and all sorts of bleeping gadgets. Its staff is well-trained and come from all corners of the world.
 
St. Elizabeth’s care center is unique, says Sister Jethro Nkenglefac. “We were constructed solely to take care of heart patients, whose care is very complicated and needs advanced technology, equipment and consumables.
 
In all of Cameroon, there is none like us.” That is particularly true when it comes to serving children with damaged hearts.
 
There is even more good news for heart patients who come here. The St. Elizabeth’s Cardiac Center charges only $3,000 for procedures – compared to $80,000 in places like the United States and Europe. But access to its services is limited. To reach to the hospital, just on the other side of the hill, Mfout had to travel along one of the country’s worst roads.
 
Going to the cardiac hospital is not an easy task even for someone with a healthy heart.  Usually there is only one truly drivable road that links it to the rest of the country through the regional capital Bamenda.  But earlier this year, sections of the Bamenda-Kumbo highway were under repair – making the drive slightly smoother than before. All other roads that lead to the center are, in the best of times, winding rugged paths through hills and valleys.

When it’s dry, the journey can last an entire day. When it’s wet, it’s common for travelers to be stuck in knee-deep mud – meaning it would take two to three days to travel between 50 to 100 kilometers.  And, in the absence of adequate transportation, patients often travel by overloaded mini-buses and even motorcycles.

Why in the middle of nowhere?

Sister Jethro says the remote location was chosen for several reasons. It’s close to an existing hospital that could donate staff, services and land.  The climate – with temperatures dropping to four degrees Celsius – is well-suited for cardiac care: doctors say wounds heal faster in lower temperatures.  

But the most important reason appears to have been the desire to reach to poor rural patients. “The Tertiary Sisters, who are the brain behind all this, is a religious congregation with one of their main objectives being to attend to the poor and the underprivileged,” Sister Jethro says. “You hardly find us in the cities. You find us in the most remote parts of the world, where people really need us; where nobody goes to.”

Yet, some make the difficult journey.  Sometimes, rich people come by helicopter. Others stay home, hoping that community outreach workers will come to them with medication.

Those who live in big cities can take advantage of mobile clinics run by the St. Elizabeth’s Cardiac Center. The traveling program involves transferring the entire out-patient department to a partner hospital where cardiologists, pharmacists, nurses are brought in to consult people on the spot.

Critics blame the poor access to the hospital on a mixture of politics and bad policies. The northwest, the region where the center is located, is considered an opposition stronghold, and local residents think the government punished them with bad roads. But it’s also clear that country’s health policy does not take into account the problem of accessibility. Roads are the business of the ministry of works and hospitals are overseen by the ministry of public health. Both have different priorities.

Patients are the ones who suffer from the failure to coordinate policies:  the ill must decide whether the slow and tortuous trip is worth it.  Many do not make it to the hospital alive.

Pakistan Military Asked to Protect Polio Workers

Pakistan Military Asked to Protect Polio Workers

 

A Pakistani health worker gives a child a polio vaccine in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, Tuesday, April 8, 2014

A Pakistani health worker gives a child a polio vaccine in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, Tuesday, April 8, 2014

 — Pakistan’s prime minister has asked the military to help protect polio vaccination workers in the insurgency-plagued northwest. The request comes as authorities say a Taliban ban on vaccinations in 2012 and deadly attacks on anti-polio teams have prevented thousands of children from getting inoculated.  
 
Pakistan is one of only three countries where polio remains endemic. Recent national eradication efforts have suffered critical setbacks, threatening global gains against the crippling disease.
 
Militant attacks in recent months have killed or injured more than 30 vaccination workers and police officers escorting them.  Pakistani Taliban leaders have banned immunization campaigns in two North and South Waziristan districts that border Afghanistan.
 
The violence and the Taliban ban are blamed for this year’s increase in polio victims in these areas. Officials say the country has recorded at least 43 cases, most of them in the Waziristan area. Pakistan reported 93 polio cases in 2013.  
 
On Thursday, Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, for the first time, asked the military to protect polio workers.  
 
Elias Durry heads the World Health Organization’s polio eradication program in Pakistan. He praised the stepped-up effort against the crippling virus.  
 
“The program is missing close to 260,000 children both in North and South Waziristan and some neighboring areas,” said Durry. “And this lack of vaccination in these areas have been going on since June of 2012 and that is manifested currently, by you know, almost exclusively most of the cases that the country has now, most of the children who are paralyzed, are coming from those areas.”
 
The militant-dominated Waziristan and adjoining tribal areas are considered some of the last wild polio virus reservoirs in the world. Taliban extremists have blocked polio vaccination teams, accusing them of acting as American spies.

The suspicions stem from a CIA-sponsored fake vaccination program that helped the U.S. military locate and kill Osama bin Laden in Pakistan in 2011. Both United Nations and Pakistani officials blame the United States for undermining the anti-polio program.  
 
U.N. officials worry polio outbreaks in Pakistan may result in some countries imposing travel restrictions on Pakistanis.

New Ebola Strain Causing West Africa Outbreak

New Ebola Strain Causing West Africa Outbreak

 

In this photo provide by MSF, healthcare workers prepare isolation and treatment areas for Ebola in Gueckedou, Guinea

In this photo provide by MSF, healthcare workers prepare isolation and treatment areas for Ebola in Gueckedou, Guinea

 — The strain of Ebola virus that has killed 121 people in West Africa may have been circulating there undetected for some time, according to a new study.
 
This is the first reported outbreak of Ebola in West Africa. But the new study in the New England Journal of Medicine said this strain of the virus may not be new to the area.
 
Researchers from Africa and Europe compared viral DNA from this outbreak to previous episodes.
 
They confirmed that it is a member of the Zaire species, which kills most of its victims. Strains of that virus have caused outbreaks previously in Gabon and the Democratic Republic of Congo.
 
But this virus is a new strain, a previously unknown sister in the Zaire family.
 
Virologist Jens Kuhn at the National Institutes of Health said there may be more.
 
“There might be a lot of variety in these viruses. They might be in many different countries in West Africa and East Africa where we have not heard anything of outbreaks so far,” said Kuhn.
 
Kuhn was not part of this research. He leads the top NIH lab studying the world’s most dangerous viruses, and he is working on ways to treat and prevent infection with them. Kuhn said there is a lesson in this outbreak.
 
“This is a warning that the variability of these viruses is greater than we knew. And so it’s very important that we develop something that is broadly based and not protects only against a particular virus that we knew of before,” said Kuhn.
 
Right now, the best protection is to avoid contact with blood or bodily fluids from an infected person.

Mount Everest Climb Exposes Diabetes Mechanism – Study

Mount Everest Climb Exposes Diabetes Mechanism – Study

 

 A team of mountaineers is seen climbing Mount Everest.

A team of mountaineers is seen climbing Mount Everest.

Using the world’s highest mountain, Mount Everest, as an outdoor laboratory, a group of British researchers has identified a mechanism involved in the development of adult onset diabetes.  Experts say the findings could lead to development of treatments to prevent the disease.

At more than 8,800 meters above sea level, Mount Everest in Nepal is the world’s highest peak.  Climbers require supplemental oxygen because the air is so thin. 
Hypoxia, or lack of blood oxygen, is a risk factor for the onset of Type 2 diabetes. 

So, researchers with the Mount Everest project sought to identify the mechanisms by which low oxygen levels contribute to disease in patients who are critically ill with diabetes.

Mike Grocott, a professor of anesthesia and critical care medicine at Southampton University, led the study, which began at an Everest base camp 5,300 meters above sea level.

The expedition included about 200 climbers.  But Grocott says researchers focused on 24 individuals who underwent assessments of glucose control, body weight changes and inflammation biomarkers.  The measurements were taken at six weeks and again at two months.  Eight climbers then continued their trek to the peak.

In the low oxygen environment, Grocott says the participants’ insulin levels began to rise, indicating their bodies were becoming insulin resistant.

There also was an increase in biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress, or cellular damage, similar to what’s seen in people with Type 2 diabetes.

On the ground, Grocott says the findings suggest treatments might be developed to prevent the disease.

“Helping to control the tendency towards diabetes may be interventions that are focusing on either the development of this oxidative stress or this inflammation,” says Grocott.

In an article published in the journal PLoS ONE, investigators report the abnormal biomarkers, caused by the extreme altitude, were reversed once the participants came off the mountain.

Many people who develop diabetes suffer from sleep apnea, in which their airways become obstructed – sometimes hundreds of times per night. 

“That is likely to predispose them to certainly intermittent hypoxia during sleep.  And that may be something that is contributing toward this tendency to develop Type 2 diabetes,” says Grocott.

Grocott says investigators are now comparing the climbers, most of whom were Caucasian, to the Sherpa to see whether genetic differences protect the indigenous Nepalese population from diabetes.

WHO: Ebola Death Toll Tops 120

WHO: Ebola Death Toll Tops 120

 

Keiji Fukuda, Assistant Director-General for Health Security and Environment of World Health Organization (WHO), right, answers questions during Shanghai press conference

Keiji Fukuda, Assistant Director-General for Health Security and Environment of World Health Organization (WHO), right, answers questions during Shanghai press conference

The World Health Organization (WHO) says the death toll from the Ebola outbreak in West Africa is up to at least 121.

WHO says health ministries in Guinea, Liberia and other affected countries have reported about 200 confirmed or suspected cases of the virus.

The vast majority of victims are in Guinea, where officials have reported 168 cases, including 108 deaths. Liberia reports 13 deaths from the disease.

Health workers walk in an isolation center for people infected with Ebola at Donka Hospital in Conakry, April 14, 2014.

Health workers walk in an isolation center for people infected with Ebola at Donka Hospital in Conakry, April 14, 2014.

News reports Tuesday said Gambian authorities have ordered airlines not to pick up passengers from affected countries.
  

Last week, WHO Assistant Director-General Keiji Fukuda said the West Africa outbreak was one of the most challenging outbreaks of Ebola health officials that have ever faced. He predicted it could take up to four months to contain the outbreak.

The outbreak began in a forested southeastern region of Guinea in February. Since then, health officials have reported confirmed or suspected cases in Liberia, Mali and Sierra Leone.

The Ebola virus is spread by contact with bodily fluids. It can cause symptoms that include vomiting, unstoppable bleeding and organ failure.

Health officials are trying to stop the disease from spreading by isolating the sick and tracking down people they came in contact with.

This is the first major outbreak of Ebola in West Africa.

 

Q&A with Ishtiaq Mannan: Preventing Newborn Deaths (Listen to audio report)

Q&A with Ishtiaq Mannan: Preventing Newborn Deaths (Listen to audio report)

Monowara holds her 22-day-old grandson Arafat, as she walks through a mustard field on the outskirts of Dhaka.

Monowara holds her 22-day-old grandson Arafat, as she walks through a mustard field on the outskirts of Dhaka.

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Save the Children says that over a million babies die each year on their birthday. These are preventable deaths. However, some Asian countries are bright spots in this sad reality. In its newest report, Ending Newborn Deaths, Bangladesh figures prominently. It’s the region’s greatest success at making successful strides in reining in this statistic.
 
Ishtiaq Mannan told VOA’s Frances Alonzo that the deaths happen because of premature birth and complications during birth.
 


MANNAN: These newborn deaths happen on the first day of life, actually, [they] can be attributed to intra-partum complications, which is mostly known as birth asphyxia, then prematurity is one of the leading causes of the first day deaths and also infection. So these are the three major causes that contribute to the first day deaths. 
 
ALONZO: In this report, Bangladesh figures prominently. Tell me why.
 
MANNAN: There are two sides of Bangladesh being featured in this report as one of the focus countries. Bangladesh has made tremendous progress over the last several decades in terms of reducing child mortality. Now, when I say child mortality, that means we consider “under five mortality,” children under five. So, over the last two decades child mortality has come down significantly to a level of 41 per 1,000 live births. And Bangladesh is one of the very rare countries which are on track for achieving Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG 4) [which is to reduce child mortality.]
 
So that is a big success story, I would say, and can be attributed towards Bangladesh’s effort to get very good coverage, almost universal coverage of immunization, treatment of diarrhea, treatment of pneumonia. And also on the maternal health side, Bangladesh has been able to reduce the maternal mortality by 40% over the last one decade.  So that is the success side of it, and the attributing factor like skilled attendants at delivery has almost doubled over the last eight years.
 
But on the other hand, if we look at the levels now… mothers who are delivering at facilities with skilled attendants are really only one third of the total mothers. That means two thirds of Bangladeshi mothers that are still delivering at home at the hand of unskilled providers. So, these mothers are at a risk, both the mothers and the newborn babies that are being born to these mothers. On the other hand, there is an issue of quality of care, the care that is being given to the mothers that are of questionable quality in many cases. 
 
The other aspect is the inequity part of it. Though Bangladesh is a small homogenous country, it has a huge population of 160 million. The last challenge that Bangladesh is facing is strengthening of the health systems. So the health systems like human resource problems, health workforce issues, then the availability of acceptable and usable quality of information, supervision system, mentoring support, logistic supply. These are the overarching issues that are actually resulting into poor coverage and quality.
 
ALONZO: Earlier, you spoke of the strides that are happening in Bangladesh. Tell me about how other countries in Asia are faring.
 
MANNAN: Nepal, I would say, is just like Bangladesh, who is very much on track on achieving Millennium Development Goal 4 and 5 [which is to improve maternal health.]  So, Nepal has shown and demonstrated that use of community based volunteers, community based approaches and continuous commitment from the government can make a big difference. 
 
Some parts of India are making very good progress and you know India is a very big country. And there are still inequity issues.  But in the recent past [the] Indian government has recruited over a million of health workers and this health workforce is now acting as a vehicle to the rural communities to get the newborn health care services in their households. 
 
And also there are Pakistan and Afghanistan, who are making significant progress.  
 
ALONZO: Tell me about how this report, from the regular person right off the street, how can it help them?
 
MANNAN: A report cannot change the world. But then, the report brings people to focus their attention and to identify the right problem and where we need to focus. So the good thing about this report, what I like as a reader, I would say, that this points [a] finger, that we should really look at who are most vulnerable, who are dying and where we should focus our support towards.

Spinal Implant Helps Paraplegics Regain Some Functions (watch video report)

Spinal Implant Helps Paraplegics Regain Some Functions (watch video report)

Severe spinal cord injuries usually lead to total loss of control of lower extremities, as well as bladder, bowel and sexual functions. But scientists at the University of Louisville, Kentucky, say an implanted electrical device is helping the patients regain at least some of that control.

A dirt bike accident five years ago left Ken Stephenson paralyzed from the chest down. Doctors told him that he would never be able to stand up again.

“They said, based on what they’ve diagnosed and how I broke my back and everything, that I wouldn’t be able to move my legs again or feel anything ever again,” said Stephenson.

Another blow to the young man was the loss of sexual function.

Now, however, thanks to a small device implanted in his back that electrically stimulates his spinal cord, Stephenson has regained some ability to enjoy activities he thought were left behind forever.

Dr. Roderic Pettigrew, of the National Institutes of Health, explained, “The goal was to modulate those damaged nerves in the spinal cord so that they once again could, would, become receptive to stimuli.”

The stimulator is turned on with a remote control and allows Stephenson to move one leg at the time. Other functions improved, too.

“The sexual function thing was huge for me because it was basically nothing before and, I mean, now, like, it’s a lot better,” said Stephenson.

Three other patients reported similar improvements, although none of them can walk.

Pettigrew stresses that the device is not a cure and that more research is needed before it can be widely available. He said a spinal cord injury, though, may no longer mean a lifelong sentence of paralysis.

“What we see today with these four individuals now being able to have voluntary motion and voluntary control of their limbs and involuntary control of functions like bladder and bowel is very exciting,” said Pettigrew.

Researchers now plan to implant the device in eight more patients and try to stimulate more than one muscle group at the time.

Punjab University Quality Enhancement Cell Director Prof Dr Aamir Ijaz delivers lecture at University of Health Sciences UHS Lahore

Punjab University Quality Enhancement Cell Director Prof Dr Aamir Ijaz  delivers lecture at University of Health Sciences UHS Lahore

LAHORE: Punjab University Quality Enhancement Cell Director Prof Dr Aamir Ijaz delivered a lecture on “Impact of Quality Enhancement Cell on Higher Education Institutions” at University of Health Science (UHS). On this occasion UHS VC, Deans, HOD’s and students of different faculties and departments were present. In his address UHS VC Maj Gen (r) Prof Dr Muhammad Aslam said that QEC’s were vital organs of Universities. He said that Quality Assurance was not possible without awareness of the benefits of quality of services which has been imparted at educational institutions. Prof Dr Aamir Ijaz delivered a lecture about the impact of Quality Enhancement Cells on quality assurance of education and discussed criteria of self assessment manual. He also shared the good practices of QEC, Punjab University with the audience. The presentation was very much appreciated by the participants; they said that such workshops should be conducted on regular basis.

Shalamar Hospital Lahore Hospital gets Rs 50 million grant cheque

Shalamar Hospital Lahore  Hospital gets Rs 50 million grant cheque

LAHORE: Adviser to Chief Minister on Health Khawja Salman Rafiq, on behalf of Chief Minister Shahbaz Sharif, gave a cheque of Rs 50 million as annual grant to a representative of the Shalimar Trust Hospital (STH) on Monday.

Health Parliamentary Secretary Khawaja Imran Nazir, Health Director General Dr Zahid Pervaiz and other senior officers of the department were present on the occasion.
Talking to the press, Rafiq said that the Punjab government would continue to patronise and provide financial assistance to such institutions, which were rendering valuable services to the humanity.
He said that the STH was upgrading its different specialties, including cardiology, and was providing good treatment facilities to the masses.
He said that the government was seriously considering doubling the annual grant of the STH up to Rs 100 million.
Meanwhile, Rafiq has said that no leniency will be shown to substandard and illegal blood banks and that stringent laws are being formulated to monitor these banks in the province.
He said this while presiding over a meeting of the Punjab Blood Transfusion Authority (PBTA) at the Institute of Blood Transfusion on Monday. Health Parliamentary Secretary Khawaja Imran Nazir, Health Director General Dr Zahid Pervaiz and other officials attended the meeting.
Rafiq directed the officials concerned to accelerate the pace of registration of blood banks for ensuring safe transfusion facility to patients.
The meeting decided that all blood banks would be intimated through advertisements in the print media to get themselves registered with the PBTA within three months after which failing banks would be sealed. The meeting also recommended taking strict action against substandard and fake blood banks in the province.
Khawaja Nazir said that things would not be streamlined without taking strict action against defaulters.

Fundraising exhibition to combat blindness

Fundraising exhibition to combat blindness

LAHORE: The Standard Chartered Bank held an art exhibition titled ‘The Artists’ Vision: Seeing is Believing’ at its MM Alam Road Branch on Saturday.

According to a statement, the exhibition of drawing, paintings, photography, sculpture, ceramics and music was organised in line with the bank’s philosophy of understanding and celebrating local culture and its commitment to community-based programmes.
The statement says that the bank staunchly believes in showcasing country’s artistic talent, recognising that Pakistan’s rich cultural heritage deserves to be celebrated.
The inspiration to organise this event flowed from bank’s global initiative, ‘Seeing is Believing’, through which the bank has been working to eliminate avoidable blindness since 2003.
The aim of this event was to not only provide clients with a memorable experience of contributing towards the celebration of Pakistani art but also to bring people together for a noble cause.
A portion of the sales proceeds will be donated to the bank’s local community investment partner in the ‘Seeing is Believing’ initiative, the Layton Rehmatullah Benevolent Trust (LRBT).
The bank will match the amount raised for ‘Seeing is Believing’ through this event, doubling the impact of everyone’s generosity.
The aim of the Standard Chartered Bank is to raise $100 million by 2020 and to reach 50 million people worldwide.
The bank says that with guidance and collaboration of non-government organisation partners like Sight Savers International and the LRBT, it has been able to reach 11 million people since 2003, helping to bring essential and quality eye-care to some of the poorest communities.

Preventive measures urged to reduce malaria

Preventive measures urged to reduce malaria

ISLAMABAD: The health experts on Monday said that serious measures are essential to reduce malaria in the country. According to them, malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by parasites that are transmitted to people through the bites of infected mosquitoes, particularly in the coming high-risk season.They said that non-immune travellers from malaria-free areas are very vulnerable to the disease when they get infected. Wasim Khawaja from Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences (PIMS) said that parents and caretakers of the children need to realise that it is their moral, ethical and religious obligation to ensure that their children are protected against such diseases.He urged the media personnel to play their vital role in motivating families and communities to avail free vaccination service for such diseases available in the hospitals. He added that malaria is an acute febrile illness, adding that in a non-immune individual, symptoms appear after seven days or more, usually 10 to 15 days after the mosquito bite. Khawaja said that the first symptoms, like fever, headache, chills and vomiting, may be mild and difficult to recognise. If not treated within 24 hours, malaria can progress to severe illness often leading to death, he added.He said that the children with severe malaria frequently develop one or more of the symptoms like severe anaemia, respiratory distress in relation to metabolic acidosis, or cerebral malaria. He noted that in adults, multi-organ involvement is also frequent while in malaria endemic areas, people may develop partial immunity, allowing symptomatic infections to occur.Khawaja added that malaria epidemics could occur when climate and other conditions suddenly favour transmission in areas where people have little or no immunity to malaria.

Pakistan Senate wants ban on YouTube lifted

Pakistan Senate wants ban on YouTube lifted

ISLAMABAD: A parliamentary panel on Monday unanimously passed a resolution to lift the ban on video-sharing website YouTube and also adopted another resolution against incidents of cannibalism in the country and for stringent legislation against this menace.

The meeting of the Senate’s Functional Committee on Human Rights, chaired by Senator Afrasiab Khattak, decided to raise the YouTube ban. “The ban on the website is of no use,” the committee members opined. The committee also took notice of cannibalism in the country on the request of Senator Sahar Kamran and recommended strong steps against this crime. Unanimously adopting a resolution against the menace, the committee observed that punishment against this crime should be made more severe to prevent its recurrence.
“We demand the government carry out necessary legislation against this crime,” the committee members urged. The committee showed serious concern over operations under the Pakistan Protection Ordinance (PPO) in Sindh as well as in Punjab by saying that all the opposition parties and human rights groups have rejected the “draconian law”. Pakistan People’s Party’s Senator Farhatullah Babar said that the PPO permits security forces to commit extra-judicial killings, a grave violation of human rights.
Senator Nasreen Jalil showed distrust in the figures presented by the Sindh and Punjab police regarding the police encounters, and said that 45 workers of the MQM are missing and their details have been provided to the Sindh special home secretary. Punjab additional home secretary told the committee that the provincial government has been undertaking the registration of kilns in the province to check the exploitation of labourers there. “So far 53,000 kilns have been registered where 150,000 people are working,” he said.
The committee also showed concern over growing violence against the journalists in the country when the assassination attempt on Hamid Mir was raised in the meeting. The government should take measures to protect the lives of the journalists, the committee suggested, saying that the attack on Hamid Mir brought a bad name to the country globally. It termed the attack an aggression against the freedom of press and called for arresting the culprits.
Sahar Kamran noted that allegations against the intelligence agencies after the attack on Hamid Mir should be verified and a transparent inquiry should be conducted to bring fore the truth. Chairman Khattak felt that the government should formulate a comprehensive anti-terrorism policy to fight against this menace. The committee also sought proposals from the Ministry of Law, Justice and Human Rights to control the rising crimes against womenfolk, like vanni, sehra, karokari, etc.
Annoyed over the absence of minister for human rights and the ministry’s secretary, the committee decided to write a letter to the prime minister against their “uncooperative attitude”. Senator Mushahid Hussain Sayed presented a report of the sub-committee of the Human Rights Standing Committee and informed that for the first time the environmental impact of changing weather patterns have been included in the human rights category.

CRC Conducts Workshop for SDSB Faculty – Lahore University of Management Sciences LUMS

CRC Conducts Workshop for SDSB Faculty – Lahore University of Management Sciences LUMS 

CRC Conducts Workshop for SDSB Faculty - Lahore University of Management Sciences LUMS

CRC Conducts Workshop for SDSB Faculty – Lahore University of Management Sciences LUMS

The Case Research Centre (CRC) at the Suleman Dawood School of Business (SDSB) conducted a two-day faculty training workshop titled, “Achieving Excellence in Teaching – Values, Norms and Processes’ on April 11 – 12, 2014 for the SDSB faculty. The workshop focused on the reinforcement of SDSB values and ethics through sessions like ‘Exploring the Learning Process’ and ‘Desired Values and Behaviours for the Faculty’. Day 2 comprised operational sessions, such as ‘Course Outline / Course Designing Methods’ and ‘The Role of PCO and Zambeel’. The Workshop was led by Dr. Anwar Khurshid as the Programme Director and Dr. Adnan Zahid as the Co-Programme Director. Instructors included Dr. Ghufran Ahmed, Dr. Arif N. Butt, Dr. M. Naiman Jalil, Dr. Jamshed H. Khan, Dr. Tariq M. Jadoon (Zambeel) and Sualeha Hussain (PCO).

This is the 2nd workshop in a 3 workshop series which has provided the SDSB faculty with an effective platform to share teaching experiences and ideas with each other; reflect on teaching practices and discuss best practices in teaching and learning.

The Pro Chancellor of LUMS, Syed Babar Ali closed the workshop with an inspiring reflection on the values and ethics on which SDSB and LUMS was founded.

B.Ed. 2nd Annual Examination, 2013 & 1st Annual Examination, 2014- University of the Punjab Lahore

B.Ed. 2nd Annual Examination, 2013 & 1st Annual Examination, 2014- University of the Punjab Lahore

It is hereby notified that the last date for receipt of Admission Forms and Fee of B.Ed. 2nd Annual Examination, 2013 & 1st Annual Examination, 2014 will be as under:-
With Single Fee: 16-05-2014. 

With Double Fee: 30-05-2014.

Commencement date of B. Ed. 2nd Annual Examination, 2013 & 1st Annual Examination, 2014 will be announced later.
Dated: 15-04-2014.
(GHULAM JILANI) 
Deputy Controller (Conduct)
for Controller of Examinations.