Female Hormone Estrogen Blocks Ebola Virus Infection

Female Hormone Estrogen Blocks Ebola Virus Infection

Female Hormone Estrogen Blocks Ebola Virus Infection

Female Hormone Estrogen Blocks Ebola Virus Infection

Researchers have discovered that drugs containing female estrogen block infection with the Ebola virus, a deadly disease for which there is no cure.  Scientists stumbled upon estrogen as a potential weapon against Ebola while looking to find new uses for old drugs.

Ebola hemorrhagic virus is named after a river in the Democratic Republic of Congo in Africa, the continent where the disease is endemic.  The infection, discovered in 1976, is extremely deadly, with a mortality rate of up to 90 percent.  And amid concerns that the highly lethal virus could be weaponized by bioterrorists, scientists have been looking for ways to prevent infection with Ebola.

Lisa Johansen, director of research programs at Zalicus, a biotechnology company located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, says she and researchers at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases in Maryland and at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville screened 2,000 existing drugs, looking for chemical compounds that were effective against Ebola.

Investigators discovered that a number of human-made drugs, including selective estrogen receptor modulators, or SERMS, blocked Ebola’s entry into cells in lab cultures and in mice.

But it wasn’t the estrogen drugs’ hormonal activity that thwarted the Ebola virus, preventing infection.

Rather, Johansen says it was the compound’s chemical structure, and the structure of a number of other drugs, that hindered the microorganism, something that surprised researchers.

“I think that’s one of the things that’s exciting…When we looked at our inhibitors, we found that a lot of them are entry inhibitors.  And a lot of them have the structure even though the mechanism is for something completely unrelated,” Johansen said.

SERMS are so-called designer drugs designed to act like estrogen without negative side effects.  For example, Tamoxifen is an older SERM used to treat breast cancer and the newer Reloxifen is approved for the prevention and treatment of the bone-weakening condition osteoporosis.  But they have potentially serious side effects such as an increased risk of other types of cancer.

Johansen envisions using SERMS and other repurposed compounds in a number of situations to prevent infection and death.

“I think they could be used both by a civilian population where outbreaks are as well as potentially by the military if they were in an area where there was an outbreak and they went in to intercede, or if somebody used them for bio-warfare,” Johansen said.

An article on using estrogen drugs and other compounds to prevent Ebola virus infection is published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

UN: Epidemic of Violence Against Women is Global

UN: Epidemic of Violence Against Women is Global

A pedestrian walks over an illustration to draw attention to domestic violence against women, on International Women's Day in central Istanbul, Turkey

A pedestrian walks over an illustration to draw attention to domestic violence against women, on International Women’s Day in central Istanbul, Turkey

GENEVA — The World Health Organization says physical and sexual violence against women has reached epidemic proportions, affecting more than one-third of all women globally.  A new study just released by WHO shows violence against women is widespread and pervasive, cutting across different regions and all income levels in society. The data is part of a report just unveiled in Geneva.

The study finds one woman in three in the world will experience physical or sexual violence sometime during her lifetime by someone she knows – a husband, a boyfriend, a family member or friend.

The report says women of all ages, young and old alike, are subject to violence. The World Health Organization calls violence against women widespread and pervasive. It says it is a global health problem of epidemic proportions.

In an analysis of international homicide statistics, the study finds that a husband or a close partner is responsible for 38 percent of the murders of women worldwide.

Claudia Garcia-Moreno, lead specialist of Gender, Reproductive Rights, Sexual Health and Adolescence at WHO and one of the authors of the report, says physical and sexual violence against women takes a tremendous toll on the health of women. She says 42 percent of women beaten up by their partners suffer injuries.

“Women who have experienced physical or sexual violence were two times more likely to be depressed or to have problems with alcohol use compared to women who have never experienced this violence. They were twice as likely to have had an abortion. They were one and one half times more likely to have had a sexually-transmitted infection and in some regions to be affected by HIV. And, they are also more likely to have low-birth-weight babies,” said Garcia-Moreno.

This is the first systematic study of global data on the prevalence of violence against women by both intimate partners and non-partners. The World Health Organization, in partnership with the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and the South African Medical Research Council, has collected data from 81 countries in 2010.

The study finds the worst affected regions are Southeast Asia, the eastern Mediterranean region and Africa, where rates of violence against women from an intimate partner hover around 37 percent. For combined intimate partner and non-partner sexual violence, the data show Africa, with 45.6 percent, has the worst record, followed by Southeast Asia, with 40.2 percent.

But the report dispels the notion that violence is a problem only in the developing countries. It shows 32.7 percent of physical and sexual violence against women occurs in high-income countries.

Intervention options

In addition to responding to women who are affected, Garcia-Moreno says measures are needed to stop the problem from happening in the first place. She highlights three areas of intervention.

“One is the prevention of child abuse and maltreatment. We know that children who are abused or who are exposed to their parents abusing each other are more likely to end up in an abusive relationship either as perpetrator or as victim…The second area is empowerment of women. Access to secondary education we know is protective, access to jobs, employment, other economical opportunities…The third area of intervention in terms of prevention is the issue of social norms. There are many countries in which this form of violence is seen as acceptable,” said Garcia-Moreno.

The World Health Organization notes talking about violence against women is taboo in many countries, and so the abuse continues.  It says awareness and open discussion of the problem is key to prevention.

New WHO guidelines stress the importance of training all levels of health workers to recognize when women may be at risk of partner violence and to know how to deal with the problem. It says the enactment and implementation of more and better laws are necessary to curb violence against women.

Mandela’s Care Spotlights S. Africa Healthcare Needs for Elderly

Mandela’s Care Spotlights S. Africa Healthcare Needs for Elderly

JOHANNESBURG — South Africa’s most famous senior citizen, Nelson Mandela, has spent nearly two weeks in a Pretoria hospital for a lung infection, and is receiving the best possible medical care, said President Jacob Zuma. But few others among South Africa’s rapidly growing elderly population are faring so well. Advocates for the elderly say the services for senior citizens have dramatically decreased in the last two decades.

At 94 years old, Nelson Mandela has received round-the-clock medical care for more than six months in the comfort of his large home in a leafy, wealthy Johannesburg suburb. By all accounts, the anti-apartheid hero is doted on by his staff, his family and by top South African officials.

Mandela is not the standard by which South Africa’s treatment of its weakest members should be judged, though, according to advocates for the elderly. Rather, they say, the nation’s growing elderly population is increasingly marginalized by a government that has focused its health care on the young.

Growing elderly population

South Africa’s elderly population is at an all-time high. The last census says about five percent of South Africans are over the age of 65. At the same time, nearly 30 percent of the population is younger than 15.

Monica Ferreira, who heads the International Longevity Center South Africa and is the former director of the Institute of Aging in Africa at the University of Cape Town, says one example of this tilt in care for the young is that the nation has just eight registered geriatric doctors.

“There were all these geriatric clinics all over the place, there were all these support groups for older people with hypertension and diabetes, there was geriatric community nursing. Now, in [19]94, all this was stopped.  All the geriatric nurses were re-deployed to vaccinate children and so on. So the government’s priorities changed totally. They wanted to bring down the infant mortality rate. They wanted to give children the best opportunities in life, in survival as well,” said Ferreira.

Multiple public health needs

Joe Maila, spokesman for the National Department of Health, said the government does care for its elderly population, but acknowledged that the department must perform triage when it comes to public health needs.

“We are not discriminating against them; despite that we don’t have necessarily a lot of doctors and what-not,” said Maila. “But it’s just that we have taken the issue of, for instance, the issue of HIV and AIDS, and, you see, we take it very seriously, that all the time we talk about it. And therefore that the people that are more vulnerable, the people who are more in trouble about it, are young people and women. It does not mean that we do not take care of the elderly. That is not true at all.”

Nursing professor Hester Klopper is CEO of the Forum for University Nursing Deans of South Africa. Klopper said the government’s policies for the elderly are excellent – but that the reality is far different. For example, she said, the elderly face long waiting times at understaffed clinics.

Mounting responsibilities

The elderly are traditionally revered in South African society. But in the past few decades, South Africa’s elderly have taken on a new role as they shoulder the responsibilities of a generation lost to AIDS. Many South African households are now headed by the elderly, and Klopper said it is common for children to be raised by their grandparents.

“So the older person is really caught in a very tight and a very difficult position in our country. There is no activism for them. They are almost silent,” she said. “And then, of course, the other part that we see is because of the older person that is so dependent on the grant that they get from government, they are very careful not to speak out against anything that government does.”

That is exactly what was encountered when approaching several elderly South Africans outside the nation’s largest health care complex, Soweto’s Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital.

A gentleman who gave his age as 64, but whose halting shuffle and missing teeth made him look much older, said he did not think the nation’s elderly were treated well. But he said he didn’t want to be seen as complaining about the government upon which he must rely.

So off he shuffled, alone, into the hospital.

American Medical Association: Obesity is a Disease

American Medical Association: Obesity is a Disease

A competitor prepares to audition for thereality television programme "Dance Your Ass Off", during which overweight or obese contestants hope to lose weight by dancing, in New York

A competitor prepares to audition for thereality television programme “Dance Your Ass Off”, during which overweight or obese contestants hope to lose weight by dancing, in New York

The largest U.S. doctors’ group said obesity is a disease. The decision, announced this week by the American Medical Association at its annual meeting, could lead to increased funding for obesity research and help people obtain insurance coverage for treatment for obesity.

The AMA said obesity requires a range of medical interventions for treatment and prevention. Most insurance companies do not cover visits to a nutritionist or doctor to treat obesity.

The U.S. obesity rate increased nearly 50 percent between 1997 and 2012, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC also said nearly 30 percent of American adults are obese and that childhood obesity has more than doubled in the past 30 years.

The World Health Organization estimates that globally, at least 2.8 million people die each year as a result of being overweight or obese.

Dr. Patrice Harris from the AMA said, “Recognizing obesity as a disease will help change the way the medical community tackles this complex issue that affects approximately one in three Americans.”

Obesity is linked to cardiovascular disease, including heart attack and stroke, high blood pressure and Type 2 diabetes. It also increases the risk for cancer.

Malaria Risk Spikes for World’s Poorest Children

Malaria Risk Spikes for World’s Poorest Children

Children living along the Thai-Burma border come to a malaria clinic in Sai Yoke district, Kanchanaburi Province, to get tested

Children living along the Thai-Burma border come to a malaria clinic in Sai Yoke district, Kanchanaburi Province, to get tested

LONDON — The poorest children in the world’s most impoverished communities are twice as likely to contract malaria as the least poor, according to a new study published in the Lancet medical journal Wednesday.

Researchers say the study, led by Britain’s Durham University and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, suggests that alleviating poverty could protect children from malaria.

Durham University Professor Steve Lindsay, who led the research, says the study highlights a possible new approach to tackling the often fatal mosquito-borne disease.

“What is novel about this is thinking about malaria not just through getting bed nets out or better medicines,” Lindsay said. “But we can actually improve or reduce malaria by assisting development in these communities.”
Young girl with malaria rests in a clinic in South Sudanese state of Nothern Bahr el Ghazal.
The research published on Wednesday is based on an analysis of nearly 5,000 English-language studies published over the past three decades. Those studies were conducted in poor communities in Africa and Asia, focusing on children up to the age of 15.

The youngsters were ranked by several factors including family assets, such as whether they have access to a bicycle or radio, levels of education, and skill sets.

By linking levels of malaria to socio-economic status, the research finds that the poorest people are hit the hardest. As an example, Lindsay explains how inadequate housing impacts the spread of malaria.

“80 percent of malaria transmission occurs indoors at night,” he said. “So if you have a nice house where it is not so leaky, you have got screening on the doors, and you may have a ceiling, then you will get fewer mosquitos coming indoors.”

Other development factors also play a role, like eating a nutritious diet or having an education, which helps people make informed decisions about malaria prevention, said Lindsay.

The study is an attempt to unite the scientific and development communities, so that the two can work together to tackle malaria.

“We are being a wee bit provocative here with our hypothesis,” said Lindsay. “First of all, scientists need to look at what are the mechanisms for where development, in its broad sense, is protective. And then look at ways of intervening — better housing, better education, helping to improve the general welfare of communities and how that might impact and reduce malaria.”

More than 2.5 billion people are at risk of malaria. The disease is endemic in more than 100 countries around the world.

Mass Comm Dept organizes award ceremony for Aspiring Media Critics & Magazine Competition – Forman Christian College FCC University FCCU Lahore

Mass Comm Dept organizes award ceremony for Aspiring Media Critics & Magazine Competition – Forman Christian College FCC University FCCU Lahore

Mass Comm Dept organizes award ceremony for Aspiring Media Critics & Magazine Competition - Forman Christian College FCC University FCCU Lahore

Mass Comm Dept organizes award ceremony for Aspiring Media Critics & Magazine Competition – Forman Christian College FCC University FCCU Lahore

The Department of Mass Communication and FJS organized an award ceremony for Aspiring Media Critics & Magazine Competition on Friday 31 May 2013. The event was attended by Chairperson Mass Communication, faculty and students. Acting Vice Rector, Dr Sufian Aslam and Dean of Humanities, Dr Waseem Anwar were the guests of honor.

The Aspiring Media Critics class competition was specially designed to educate students to observe the messages in media and write critiques in context of the videos produced by the Media Education Foundation. The critiques covered a variety of subjects, including Public Opinion and Political Communication, Media, Violence and Conflict, Media and Gender, Social Media and Digital Communication, Commercialism and Media Merchandising. A number of magazines sent their entries for the magazine competition.

Fatima Masroor won the Aspiring Media Critics Competition while magazine, Mom to be won the Magazine Competition. Photography-based magazine ‘Exposure’ and cinema magazine, ‘Virtuoso’ shared the second position. Dr Sufian Aslam and Dr Waseem Anwar distributed letters of appreciation among the winners.

This year, give your Zakat to the cause of education – Forman Christian College FCC University FCCU Lahore

This year, give your Zakat to the cause of education – Forman Christian College FCC University FCCU Lahore

This year, give your Zakat to the cause of education - Forman Christian College FCC University FCCU Lahore

This year, give your Zakat to the cause of education – Forman Christian College FCC University FCCU Lahore

Through the gift of education, people can break the shackles of ignorance and poverty and build a life of respect for themselves and their families. The first ever verses revealed by Allah Almighty highlight the importance of education:

“Read: In the name of thy Lord Who createth,
Createth man from a clot.
Read: And thy Lord is the Most Bounteous,
Who teacheth by the pen,
Teacheth man that which he knew not”.
(96:Al-‘Alaq:1-5)

Sadly in our country this gift is a luxury that many cannot afford despite being talented and deserving. We at FCC have been serving the cause of education for almost 150 years. Our student body is financially as well as socially diverse and we pride ourselves on our merit standards.

We have a current student body of 6,323 where Muslim students comprise nearly 87% of this total number. With household average monthly incomes ranging from as low as zero to20,000 Rupees, a large number of these bright youths struggle to complete their education.

Your Zakat to FCC’s Zakat Fund (Certified) can help these Muslim students live a life of dignity as educated individuals.

Zakat is one of the five pillars of Islam, the poor and needy being the recipients. By giving your Zakat to the cause of educating needy students, you serve your community and improve not only that individual’s life but also his or her family’s future.

 

National Training Workshop on Application of Molecular Diagnostics – Forman Christian College FCC University FCCU Lahore

National Training Workshop on Application of Molecular Diagnostics – Forman Christian College FCC University FCCU Lahore

National Training Workshop on Application of Molecular Diagnostics - Forman Christian College FCC University FCCU Lahore

National Training Workshop on Application of Molecular Diagnostics – Forman Christian College FCC University FCCU Lahore

The Department of Biological Sciences is organizing a three-day workshop on the Application of Molecular Diagnostics For Livestock Based Food Pathogens, from Wednesday 19 June to Monday 24 June 2013.

The organizing committee includes Dr Kauser Abdulla Malik, Dr Mashkoor Mohsin Gillani, Dr Muhammad Irfan, Dr Mian Wajahat Hussain and Dr Hamid Saeed. The speakers and trainers are Dr Mashkoor Mohsin Gillani and Dr Muhammad Irfan. The training is sponsored by the Endowment Fund Secretariat, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad and FCC and is targeted at stakeholders in livestock-based industries, assistant disease investigation officers (AIDO), food inspectors, and personnel related to public health.

Prof Muhammad Ali presents paper at DW’s Media Dialogue on Pakistani Media – Forman Christian College FCC University FCCU Lahore

Prof Muhammad Ali presents paper at DW’s Media Dialogue on Pakistani Media – Forman Christian College FCC University FCCU Lahore

Prof Muhammad Ali presents paper at DW’s Media Dialogue on Pakistani Media - Forman Christian College FCC University FCCU Lahore

Prof Muhammad Ali presents paper at DW’s Media Dialogue on Pakistani Media – Forman Christian College FCC University FCCU Lahore

Professor Muhammad Ali of the Mass Communication Department, presented his research paper at the DW’s Media Dialogue on ‘Pakistan’s Media Landscape: The Effects of Liberalization’ in Bonn, Germany. The conference was opened by Prof Dr Chtistoph Schmidt, head of the DW Akademie, at the DW headquarters.

Deutsche Welle (DW) is Germany’s leading international broadcaster with its headquarters in the city of Bonn. In the light of his research, Prof Ali spoke about the trends and challenges the Pakistani media faces in a changed, post-liberalization era.

Reflecting on the history of the Pakistani media, Prof Ali differentiated his empirical findings on three broad lines–liberalization’s effects on the contents of TV programs and working of journalists; the challenges journalists face now and the future of TV in Pakistan. His presentation was well-received by an audience comprising academicians, media practitioners, public relations officials from foreign diplomatic missions and media students from various international universities and colleges. Prof Ali also visited various departments of the DW, including the department that deals with stories mainly originating from and relating to Pakistan. He had a detailed discussion with the DW journalists on various aspects of Pakistani media and DW’s reach in Pakistan.

Other distinguished speakers present at the conference talked about digital and social media, self-censorship, the media’s role in a Pakistan-US perspective and comparative reviews of significant events’ coverage, etc. Prof Dr Michael Krzeminski of the Bonn-Rhine-Sieg University of Applied Sciences, Bonn presented the concluding remarks.

 

 

Lahore University of Management Sciences LUMS IJM Photojournalism Workshop: Photography as Voice

Lahore University of Management Sciences LUMS  IJM Photojournalism Workshop: Photography as Voice

Lahore University of Management Sciences LUMS  IJM Photojournalism Workshop: Photography as Voice

Lahore University of Management Sciences LUMS IJM Photojournalism Workshop: Photography as Voice

LUMS Initiative for Journalism and Media (IJM) presents a Photojournalism Workshop:

Photography as Voice

Founding Director IJM: Kiran Nazish

Instructor: LUMS Artist in Residence, Asim Rafiqui

Date:  June 23- 27, 2013

Submission deadline: June 17, 2013

ABOUT THE WORKSHOP

LUMS Initiative of Journalism and Media is delighted to announce a unique opportunity to learn about photojournalism from the best in the field. The Photography as Voice, aims to bring aspiring and working photojournalists from across the country, and help them produce promising journalistic work that can further be used by mainstream media outlets.

This week long residential workshop will engage elected participants into hardcore photojournalism techniques and help them hones their photography skills for globally publishable work.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE

To apply, send the material listed below at <ijm@lums.edu.pk> and <kiran.nazish@lums.edu.pk>
– Resume
– Cover letter mentioning your interest, experience (if any).
– Three samples of your photography – published or unpublished.
– 300 word description of what you wish to gain from this week long workshop – including what impact do you think photojournalism can make in storytelling.
– Three story ideas:
Story idea is any journalistic story you feel should be investigated through photography.
Your story idea is the ultimate project you will be working on throughout the workshop. The idea is to eventually try to help you get this published in a mainstream media outlet.
*If you do not have a background in photojournalism, do not feel shy to ask any questions you may have. Assistance of any sort through your application process will be provided for.

Send queries addressing the Director of IJM, Ms. Kiran Nazish, at ijm@lums.edu.pk; who will reach back to you as soon as possible.

If selected as a fellow for the workshop, you will be required to pay partial fee of the programme. (Rs 5000)

The rest of the cost will be facilitated by IJM. The cost includes residency, logistics, training, workshop material and other costs.
About the instructor: Asim Rafiqui

Asim Rafiqui is a world-class Photojournalist, currently visiting Pakistan for his journalistic and research work. He is currently, Artist in Residence at LUMS.
He has worked as an independent photographer with globally renowned publications including National Geographic (France), Stern (Germany), The Wall Street Journal Magazine, Newsweek, and Time (USA, Asia) among others. His fantastic and unconventional blog can be read at The Spinning Head.

Convocation Address 2013: Dr. Adibul Hasan Rizvi – Lahore University of Management Sciences LUMS

Convocation Address 2013: Dr. Adibul Hasan Rizvi – Lahore University of Management Sciences LUMS

Convocation Address 2013: Dr. Adibul Hasan Rizvi - Lahore University of Management Sciences LUMS

Convocation Address 2013: Dr. Adibul Hasan Rizvi – Lahore University of Management Sciences LUMS

Dr. Adil Najam, Vice Chancellor LUMS, Abdul Razzak Dawood, Rector LUMS, Respected members of the Board of Governors(BoG), Faculty members of LUMS, parents, friends, and the most important and valuable amongst us – the class of 2013. It is a great honour and privilege for me to be present here at this august gathering. My heartiest congratulations to the graduating class of 2013 and their parents for getting their dream converted into reality.

I shall be failing in my duty if I don’t congratulate the faculty members of LUMS and this institution for providing an atmosphere conducive to academic excellence.

Prof. Adil Najam, while being generous to me, has been a little unfair to the class of 2013. I am a medical doctor who is basically a matriculate with a tunnel vision and blinkers on eyes with no match to the academic excellence of your academic staff. Now we are both in a fix. I happen to be your guest and must say something while you have to bear me for some time.

You are best asset of our society in view of your outstanding academic record but perhaps you may be categorise somewhere as someone who is a product of a developing world. Let us see what is a developing world? It is a birthplace of mankind. It is the birthplace of all religious philosophies. It has been once the cradles of civilisation with a glorious past.

But today we stand at a crossroad where we have become the victim of exploitation, inequality and injustice. We have 80% world population with 20% resources in contrast with the developed world, which has 20% of the population and 80% of the resources at its disposal.Unfortunately in our own country we have been practising the same inequality. Our 80% population is either on or below the poverty line.

In such a situation, you are amongst the fortunate and privileged ones. When you leave your campus with degree in your hand, thousands of opportunities would be knocking your door within the country and abroad promising a very protected and shinning career.

But there is the other side of the coin. Pakistan has the world’s second highest number of children with no access to school. Presently, the country’s children population estimated to be 85 million out of which 27 million children of school going age have no access to school education. In total, 49.5 million adults are illiterate, the third largest number at a global level. Pakistan spends only 2.3% of its GDP on education.

You may wondering as what all these children were doing while you were going to nursery, to primary school, to college and, finally, to this prestigious institution.

The vast population of drop out children is unfortunately used as child labour in order to become a part of the economic producing unit of their families. They were rag pickers on the streets while you were being driven to school. Some of them were forced to beg, some ran away from their home as they were fed up with starvation.

Some fell victims to criminals and abused, while the rest became unskilled labourers performing jobs which may be below to human dignity. It is the poverty and economic compulsions which drove the mothers to rent their babies to beggars for small amount of money.

This is one of the greatest tragedies of our society. Nation has been robbed of this great potential wealth of educated young men and women.

Regrettably, the health sector of our country is no better. If you look at our health facilities, there are 0.6 hospitals available for a population of 100,000, with 27 registered doctors per 100,000. We suffer almost with the highest infant and maternal mortality rates. There are about 87,000 deaths every year of children from preventable diseases like polio, pneumonia, Hepatitis B, diphtheria, measles, tetanus, TB. Our Health Budget is as low as 0.8% of our GDP.

The question arises as who should pay for health?

Government or the patients?

Government is overburdened with defense and debt servicing along with the system which is plagued with bad governance and corruption.

On the other hand 80% of our population lives on or below the poverty line. When you don’t know from where the next meal would come, medicine becomes a luxury.

What is the way forward?

We have created a model based on the philosophy that every human being has the right of access to health care free with dignity irrespective of cast, color, creed and religious beliefs. It is a partnership between the community and the government where doctors are catalyst and patients are beneficiary. Medical treatment is available round the clock all along the year. Any suffering patient can enter any time as we believe in refusing nobody. There is also a constant effort on our part to be at the cutting edge of technology. Our model is autonomous, transparent and accountable to society and the government.

What we have achieved from this model?

It started as an eight-bed unit in seventies and now transcended into the largest centre of urology, nephrology, dialysis and transplantation in the region with over 4000 renal transplants. It has also become a huge cancer centre, largest lithotripsy unit and only centre for paediatric urology, nephrology and transplantation. These are few to mention. We have also established a postgraduate centre for doctors, schools of medical technology and nursing. Degree awarding status has been given to SIMS.

In developing world there are only two options for ailing person. Pay or die. We have created a third option in renal diseases where we don’t let anyone die because he can’t afford to live.

The most redeeming feature of our model is that nothing is borrowed. Thanks to the people of our country because the whole concept is Pakistani, supported by Pakistanis and run by Pakistanis. The roots lie in the soil of Pakistan. No country in the world can match this example.

But be also mindful that there are challenges awaited in the days to come. Medicine is going to be changed. A new era is going to dawn – the era of cloning, genetic engineering, and stem cell research leading to regenerative medicine, in which there will be repair, replacement and organogenesis.

Can we have access to these technologies at home? Not unless we invest in human development and especially in education; not unless we stop squandering our wealth, by denying the right of education and better life for millions of children who deserves not only our support but equal opportunities.

As regards you I am not asking you to cough up money for donation but please own the philosophy that every human being has got a right to access health and education free with dignity. Owning the philosophy on your part will change the fate of this nation. With your intellect and your education you will be able to ensure justice for the common man and for equitable distribution of the resources so that the children will attend school not forced to pick garbage from dumps or any kind of child labour.

Be aware of the skeptics. They will say inequality has been around since time immemorial. But the reality is otherwise. Our Prophet (PBUH) strongly believed in the equality of mankind, or “Musawat”, which is a basic tenet of Islam.

You can stand on your two feet and say that at LUMS we are born to make impossible possible.

Celebrating Academic Excellence of the Class of 2013 – Lahore University of Management Sciences LUMS

Celebrating Academic Excellence of the Class of 2013 – Lahore University of Management Sciences LUMS

Celebrating Academic Excellence of the Class of 2013 - Lahore University of Management Sciences LUMS

Celebrating Academic Excellence of the Class of 2013 – Lahore University of Management Sciences LUMS

An evening before LUMS 25th Annual Convocation 2013, LUMS community gathered to celebrate the academic success of its outstanding students from the graduating Class of 2013 at Graduate Night 2013 held on June 21, 2013.

Dr. Adil Najam, LUMS Vice Chancellor spoke at the event, which was followed by recognition of students who have won The National Management Foundation (NMF) Medals, Corporate Medals, and 136 Deans’ Honour List Plaques. This year, students were also able to easily register at Graduate Night with the LUMS Office of Marketing, Fundraising and Alumni to join the strong network of alumni.

Punjab University Lahore patients to be treated at Jinnah Hospital outdoor

Punjab University Lahore patients to be treated at Jinnah Hospital outdoor

LAHORE: On the request of the PU Chief Medical Officer (CMO) Dr Nauman, the administration of the Jinnah Hospital Lahore has also agreed to provide outdoor diagnostic facilities to the varsity patients on the same terms & conditions as are applicable for indoor medical treatment. It is pertinent to mention here that Punjab University has already an agreement with the Jinnah Hospital Lahore, for indoor medical treatment of University patients.

Punjab University Lahore Syndicate approves Rs 6b budget

Punjab University Lahore Syndicate approves Rs 6b budget

LAHORE: Punjab University Syndicate meeting, presided over by Vice Chancellor Prof Dr Mujahid Kamran, on Saturday approved Rs 6 billion budget for the year 2013-14. The university expects a total grant of Rs 1.777 billion from Higher Education Commission, 35 percent of its income. In the budget, the funds allocated for research has been increased from 85 million to 100 million, which is 1.5 percent of total budget. The Syndicate approved the proposal of university authorities to not to increase fee of on campus university students. The Syndicate members highly appreciated the fact that Punjab University’s academic and hostel dues were far less than other public sector universities. Syndicate was all praise for the initiative taken by Vice Chancellor Prof Dr Mujahid Kamran to facilitate Balochistani students by offering free education, free boarding facilities and Rs 3,000 stipend per month (each student) in the next year. Moreover, the university not only controlled deficit in budget 2012-13 but saved Rs 110 million from 2011-2012 which have been allocated to research endowment fund, which now has reached Rs 36 crore. The university has also set up a committee to generate funds for PU to facilitate research and development projects. It will be headed by Ms Amna Imam, Additional Secretary Higher Education Department. According to other salient features of the budget, special students will also be provided with free education along with boarding facilities while students taking admission on sports basis will be provided with free education. The university will continue to waive off tuition fee of Hafiz-e-Quran. Seed money of Rs 50 million has been allocated for the establishment of Punjab University Medical and Dental College. The university has allocated Rs 75 million for overseas scholarships and Rs 36 million for national and international conferences. In order to facilitate students, Punjab University is providing funds of Rs 93.677 million to its students in terms of scholarships, student affairs and career counseling and other activities. Punjab University is providing Rs 162 million Hostel Subsidy, Rs 59.144 million Transport Subsidy and Rs 13.730 Internet Subsidy to students. The net subsidy on the mentioned services amounts to Rs 224.967 million and in addition to above, subsidy on electricity in teaching departments is also being provided. Budget deficit is because of the subsidies provided by PU to the students who come from middle and lower middle class or from poor class.

Punjab Unversity Lahore Syndicate congratulates VC on ranking

Punjab Unversity Lahore Syndicate congratulates VC on ranking

LAHORE: The members of Punjab University Syndicate have congratulated Dr Mujahid Kamran on the improvement in the ranking of Punjab University. They also appreciated Vice Chancellor Dr Mujahid Kamran on taking initiative of facilitating Baloch students. Justice Mazhar Ali Naqvi said that PU Syndicate was a prestigious institution and legal notices must be served to the newspapers that were publishing news items against the body.